GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Different Countries

Not all countries grow GE (genetically engineered) foods and crops, and of the countries that do, some countries grow a lot more than others 

Below is a list of the countries that grow GE, and the crops and foods they grow.

Note that some countries don’t allow the growing of GE foods/crops, but might allow the importation of ingredients (we’ve used Australia as an example of this).

 

Summary – GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Different Countries

The USA, Brazil, Argentina, Canada and India all lead the world in 2016 in growing the most GMO/Biotech crops

In the US at the moment, commercially available GMO crops include Alfalfa, apples, canola, corn (field and sweet), cotton, papaya, potatoes, soybeans, squash and sugar beets. 

In total, 26 countries have total or partial bans on GMOs … with 60 others having heavy restrictions on them

In total, 38 countries ban the cultivation of GMO crops (as opposed to importing them which is different)

 

In the lists below – over time countries develop and test new GMO crops and foods, so these lists will change in the future as more GMOs become available in the commercial market.

 

Countries That Grow GMO Crops

As of 2016:

Brazil, United States, Canada, South Africa, Australia, Bolivia, Philippines, Spain, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Colombia, Honduras, Chile, Sudan, Slovakia, Costa Rica, China, India, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Mexico, Portugal, Czech Republic, Pakistan and Myanmar.

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

Countries That Grow The Most GMO/Biotech Crops

As of 2016:

USA – 72.9 Million Hectares

Brazil – 49.1 Million Hectares

Argentina – 23.8 Million Hectares

Canada – 11.6 Million Hectares

India – 10.8 Million Hectares

Paraguay – 3.6 Million Hectares

Pakistan – 2.9 Million Hectares

China – 2.8 Million Hectares

South Africa  -2.7 Million Hectares

Uruguay – 1.3 Million Hectares

Bolivia – 1.2 Million Hectares

Australia – 0.9 Million Hectares

Phillipines – 0.8 Million Hectares

Myanmar – 0.3 Million Hectares

Spain – 0.1 Million Hectares

Sudan – 0.1 Million Hectares

Mexico – 0.1 Million Hectares

Columbia – 0.1 Million Hectares

Vietnam – <0.05 Million Hectares

Honduras – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Chile – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Portugal – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Bangladesh – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Costa Rica – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Slovakia – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

Czech Republic – <0.05 0.1 Million Hectares

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

Countries With Partial Or Full Bans On The Growing Or Importation Of GMO Foods & Crops

26 countries had total or partial bans on GMOs, “including Switzerland, Australia, Austria, China, India, France, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Greece, Bulgaria, Poland, Italy, Mexico and Russia,” and … “significant restrictions on GMOs exist in about sixty other countries.”

In 2015, anti-GMO group Sustainable Pulse said that 38 countries ban the cultivation of GMO crops.

The group’s list includes Algeria and Madagascar in Africa; Turkey, Kyrgyzstan, Bhutan, and Saudi Arabia in Asia; Belize, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela in South and Central America; and 28 countries in Europe.

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In The United States

Alfalfa, apples, canola, corn (field and sweet), cotton, papaya, potatoes, soybeans, squash and sugar beets. 

– gmoanswers.com

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Brazil

Soybean, maize and cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Argentina

Soybean, maize and cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Canada

Canola, maize, soybean, sugar beet, alfalfa

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In India

Cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Paraguay

Soybean, maize and cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Pakistan

Cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In China

Cotton, papaya, poplar

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In South Africa

Soybean, maize and cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Uruguay

Soybean, maize 

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Bolivia

Soybean

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Australia

Cotton, canola

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods Ingredients Imported To Australia

Imported GM soya, Imported GM corn, Imported GM sugar beet, Cottonseed oil for GM cotton, Imported GM potatoes, GM canola

– choice.com.au

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In The Philippines

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Myanmar

Cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Spain 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Sudan 

Cotton

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Mexico

Cotton, soybean

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Columbia 

Cotton, maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Vietnam 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Honduras 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Chile 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Portugal 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Bangladesh 

Eggplant

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Costa Rica

Cotton, soybean, pineapple 

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Slovakia 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

GMO Foods & Crops Grown In Czech Republic 

Maize

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

Sources

1. https://gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org/FAQ/where-are-gmos-grown-and-banned/ 

2. https://gmoanswers.com/current-gmo-crops

3. https://www.choice.com.au/food-and-drink/food-warnings-and-safety/food-safety/articles/are-you-eating-gm-food#2%20what%20GM%20foods%20are%20grown%20in%20australia? 

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